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to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world great, about the challenges that they have had to overcome and still face. we're going to talk about b that in a few minutes in the special context of this city with our panel, and we'll take questions from you as well later. but, first, to launch us off with a presentation, here's the author, professor ed glaeser. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, bob. and thank you all so much for being here. i'm so enormously flattered that you've decided to take time out of your saturday afternoon to come and talk about, about cities. i'm also particularly grateful to the boston book festival for including this book. i, like i think every single one of you, love books, and i'm just thrilled to be part of this amazing thing
at rolling stone magazine who grew up in the detroit area returns to the city to present a history and profile the influx of artists, environmentalists and city planners who are reemerging the urban landscape. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you all for coming. i have to say first i am honored that mark asked me to be part of this world trends from ann arbor where we went to college and we are both editors at the college newspaper. i knew then that mark was from the area like i am, but i didn't know his passion to write history and the stories here can that leads to my first question which is what led you to want to write this book? remember you calling me when you were starting to work on it and said i want to write a book about detroit and so do i. but this turned out to be a very different book than most of the others. >> i said that a little tiny bit when i went out to lunch the first time and you were one of the first people, thank you first of all for doing this but i guess i have always been drawn to detroit. i thought for the longest time that it would t
magazine" returns to the city to present a history and profile the influx of artists, environmentalists, and city planners who are reimaging the urban landscion. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> i'm thrilled mark asked me to be a part of this. as they said, old friends from ann arbor where we went to college and editors at the college newspaper. i knew then that mark was from the area, like i am, but i didn't know of his intense interest in history and the stories here, and so that leads me to my first question which is what really led you to want to write this book? i remember you calling me when you were starting to work on it, and you said, i want to write a book about detroit. i thought, yeah, well, so does everybody; right? [laughter] this turned out to be a different book than others we red now. >> i sensed that a tiny bit when we got lunch. you were one the first people i talked to about it, and thank you, first of all, for doing this. i guess, i don't know, i've always been drawn to detroit as a topic, and, you know, i thought for the longest time it would be a nove
people. can you talk a little bit about how that works in a city? >> yeah. well, first of all, i've had lots of conversations with people who, quote-unquote, have made it, and when they were in tough times from famous people like tyler perry who was homeless, living in a car, to people i know throughout my community who have got, broken drug addictions, who have dealt with brutal, brutal hatred because they came out of the closet at a young age. all these stories. and it's amazing to me that everybody, including tyler perry, has these stories about how one perp's small act of -- one person's small act of kindness was a difference maker for them. and it gives me chills to think that the biggest thing we actually do on any given day probably could be a small act of kindness to someone else. and so the vulnerability and fragility of life you really get to see up close and personal in cities like ours here in new york and ours in newark, new jersey, and how it doesn't take that much effort to be there for a kid. and i see, and i was very happy during sandy, we were able to do some things th
. elect tri-city costs in the next 15 years. if you manufacture and establish the united states, you take advantage of the many trade agreements the united states has with the countries. whether it's a japanese cut me, thai company can chinese company manufactures in the united states, employing good american workers. .. >> the key is having the right set of advisors from investment bankers to accounting firms and law firms and pr firms and management consulting firms. >> we will leave it there. think you all for coming. think everyone. [applause] i was just going to thank everyone at asia society.org. thank you both for being here. it has been a great pleasure. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about the greatest suffering. >> obesity in this country is nothing short of a public health crisis. >> i think i have intentness that went up and told me when someone had their own agenda. >> i think that they serve as a window on the path to past what was going on with american women. >> she b
we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we look at the data, and in our market the security based market most transactions involve a party that isn't in the u.s.. so this is a cross border market. and how you do the cross border roles is how you do title seven. and so, we felt under those circumstances that when you are looking at the whole, it was important to take a holistic approach the cross border rules and because it was such a significant, had such a significant impact on how they were going to work that we needed to do a formal rulemaking. >> to mr. cook, thank you. i know i am out of time. i'm comfortable with what mr. cook is doing because of the data that you're going to collect. mr. gensler, it makes me a little nervous and particularly because of the different approaches. you know, and there are so many other questions i want to get to. b
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6